Vegan Pumpkin and Sage Cheesy Pasta Bake

I get so excited when an experiment works. I’ve been wanting to make the Mac Daddy (mac & cheese recipe) recipe from Veganomicon for awhile, but never got around to it. This week is Pumpkin Week on Pink Stripes and I was trying to think of a vegan pumpkin recipe for Vegan Tuesday. I wanted to cook something savory because I’ve plenty of sweets hanging out in my freezer, counter, and workplace.

I came up with the idea to make Mac Daddy, but substitute 1/2 of the Cheesy Sauce with pumpkin puree.  I also added in chopped fresh sage and used pumpkin pie spice to flavor it. I used whole-wheat linguine because I didn’t have any macaroni in the pantry.  The result was amazing. The pasta was very creamy and it smelled and tasted how Fall should taste. And it’s not just me saying that.  I bring in lunch to work at least once a week and feed some of my work friends (it’s so I can cook and not have endless leftovers that go on and on and on). They couldn’t believe it was so creamy and vegan. I made half of the pasta recipe and the full recipe of the Cheesy Sauce, which is great for nachos or pizza.

Vegan Pumpkin and Sage Cheesy Pasta Bake

Adapted from Veganomicon
  • 3/4 cup Cheesy Sauce, see below
  • 3/4 cup canned pumpkin puree
  • 2 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice
  • 12 ounces whole-wheat linguine
  • 8 ounces extra-firm tofu
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh sage
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
  1. Cook pasta according to package directions in a large pot of boiling salted water. Pre-heat oven to 325° F.
  2. Meanwhile, combine Cheesy Sauce with pumpkin puree and spice.
  3. When pasta is ready, drain and set aside.
  4. In small baking dish, crumble tofu until it resembles ricotta cheese. Add sage, salt, oil, and lemon juice. Stir to combine. Stir in sauce and then add pasta, mixing well. Flatten down the top and place in oven, baking for 30 minutes until top is lightly browned and bubbly.

Serves 4.

Cheesy Sauce

Adapted from Veganomicon
  • 2 cups water
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • Several pinches freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/8 teaspoon tumeric
  • 3/4 cup nutritional yeast flakes
  • 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon prepared yellow mustard
  1. Combine water and flour and whisk until flour is dissolved. A few lumps are okay.
  2. Heat oil in small saucepan over medium low heat. Add garlic and stir cooking for 2 minutes, making sure garlic doesn’t burn. Add spice, salt, and pepper and stir to combine. Add flour/water mixture, tumeric, and nutritional yeast. Increase heat to medium and whisk continuously for 3 minutes. The sauce will start to bubble and thicken. Remove from heat and add lemon juice and mustard. Taste for seasoning.

Makes approximately 3 cups.

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Yes, I did it again.

But this time I made chocolate ones! And almond ones! and oh my, cheese ones!

choc-croissant

This was my second time making croissants from scratch. My first time was such a big achievement for me. It was a lot of work and faith because I didn’t know how they would turn out.

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They were so successful and delicious, that I had no qualms about making them again when they came up as the next recipe for me to try out of The Art and Soul of Baking. This recipe is slightly different than Tartine’s recipe, but the method is the same.  Lots of rolling and turning and refrigerating the dough. It takes about 2 days to make them, so you do have to have a chunk of time to devote. Of course, much of the time is off-hand. You also need space to roll out the dough. And butter, lots of butter. 😛

These made smaller croissants, so they aren’t as big and gorgeous as my first go-around. But the taste was definitely still there. Because I made all-plain the first go-around, I decided to make all the variations in the book this time. The recipe makes 24 decent sized croissants. I made six each of: chocolate, almond, cheese, and plain.

croissants chocolate filling

The chocolate and cheese were simple, you just had some of the grated ingredient before you roll the croissants. The almond ones required me to make an almond pastry filling made from almond paste, sugar, (more) butter, egg, lemon zest, vanilla, and a bit of flour.

croissants waiting to be baked

This recipe was a bit easier for me than the first time. It wasn’t painful to roll out the dough and turn it and cut it and shape it. I would almost say croissants are easy to make and I have absolutely no qualms about making them again. And I definitely will.

croissants waiting to be baked2

My favorite was the cheese one, because I’m a cheese freak. I used Baby Swiss, which is a semi-soft cheese that is milder and more melty than regular Swiss. The other flavors were quite tasty too.  You can find the recipe for both the croissants and the almond filling HERE.

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I’m submitting this to Yeastspotting, a weekly round-up of yeasted goods and bread.